A further grapheme for /k/ + /w/ (qu)

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Judy
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A further grapheme for /k/ + /w/ (qu)

Post by Judy » Tue Apr 22, 2008 10:44 am

I have always thought that there was just the one grapheme representing the 'qu' sound but am now wondering about the 'cqu' in words such as 'acquit', 'acquire'. 'acquaintance' etc

I know that the letter 'c' is actually part of the prefix 'ac' but for reading/spelling purposes it is 'silent' in these words. So, in order to avoid 'silent letters' would it be better to teach 'cqu' as a spelling alternative for /kw/ ?

(I have a few older pupils who would be likely to come across such words).

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Susan Godsland
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Post by Susan Godsland » Tue Apr 22, 2008 12:13 pm

Judy, I teach /k/ as a separate sound.

At stage 2 in SRS we cover /k/ = lk (yolk folk) cc (accuse accurate) cq (acquire acquaint) que (cheque mosque) qu (bouquet liquor)

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Post by Judy » Tue Apr 22, 2008 12:37 pm

Thank you, Susan, but I can't quite fathom how you'd segment, for instance, 'acquaint' in that case - unless, of course, the letter 'u' is representing the /w/, as in 'language' and 'penguin'. :???:

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Susan Godsland
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Post by Susan Godsland » Tue Apr 22, 2008 12:43 pm

Yes, that's what I do. acquaint =a/ k/w/a-i/n/t :smile:

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Post by Judy » Tue Apr 22, 2008 12:52 pm

So do you teach 'u' as a spelling of /w/?

I've wondered about that but didn't think there were enough examples to merit it - though if you add all the 'acqu-' words it amounts to quite a few more!

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Susan Godsland
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Post by Susan Godsland » Tue Apr 22, 2008 1:07 pm

I don't often teach /w/ as a separate lesson, in fact, I haven't done so yet.

When we are covering stage 2 /k/, I would simply point out that the u is the /w/ sound in 'acquaint' if the tutee didn't spontaneously say /w/ when reading the word.

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maizie
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Post by maizie » Tue Apr 22, 2008 5:14 pm

I always teach 'u' as a spelling of /w/. I don't like teaching 'qu' as one sound, because it isn't. Although 'u' as /w/ is normally with 'q', how about 'persuade' and 'suede'?

I see your point about the 'cq' in 'acquaint' etc. Judy. Nice one. But I don't think 'my' children ever come across those words :sad:

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Susan Godsland
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Post by Susan Godsland » Tue Apr 22, 2008 5:27 pm

Could u being a spelling for /w/ be linked to the fact that when we say /w/ we actually make a short /oo/ sound?

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maizie
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Post by maizie » Tue Apr 22, 2008 6:07 pm

If you look at old documents you'll find 'u' and 'w' are used interchangeably (as are 'y' & 'i'). The clue for me comes in the name of the letter 'w' - doubleyou. It's just 2 'u's. 'w' didn't exist in the Roman alphabet; which is what our current alphabet is based on.

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Post by chew8 » Tue Apr 22, 2008 6:50 pm

I would not agonise too much about these things - the representation of phonemes by graphemes is not an absolutely exact science.

Jenny C.

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maizie
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Post by maizie » Tue Apr 22, 2008 7:38 pm

I would not agonise too much about these things
Aw, Jenny! I was enjoying myself :grin:

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