One Minute Reading Test

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Judy
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One Minute Reading Test

Post by Judy » Sat Feb 23, 2008 12:56 pm

I have just come across this test and I think it looks more relevant as a way of measuring the progress of SP taught pupils than tests such as Burt, particularly in the early stages.

http://www.dyslexia-inst.org.uk/pdffiles/Onemin.pdf

I would be interested to know what others think.

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maizie
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Post by maizie » Sat Feb 23, 2008 1:20 pm

Slightly dubious about a test which proclaims that all the words are one syllable and then includes 'into' and 'upon'!

Measure of reading fluency, yes. But we've discussed this topic before and some of us question the validity of 'fluency'; in that it is theoretically linked to improved comprehension and we know that children can 'comprehend' without being particularly 'fluent'.

As a measure of 'skills'? I wouldn't have though it was particularly useful - as far as I can see it doesn't cover many of the correspondences.

chew8
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Post by chew8 » Sat Feb 23, 2008 1:35 pm

Martin Turner is an old contact of mine, though, and very sound on phonics.

Jenny C.

chew8
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Post by chew8 » Sat Feb 23, 2008 3:37 pm

Another thought: this is dated 1987 and is from the Transvaal Education Department in South Africa. At that time, good phonics teaching was the norm in South African primary schools, and any test emanating from there would, I'm sure, reflect this. If the Transvaal people found this test a good one, that would be good enough for me, especially if it's also endorsed by Martin Turner.

I know that Martin did some testing in the Transvaal in 1994, and found English-speaking 9-year-olds there reading as well as children taught systematic phonics in England. This squared with what I had been told by a researcher there in 1992 and also with the results I obtained in testing spelling there in 1987 and 1992. Martin's findings were reported in the Sunday Times on 27 November 2004. I suspect that he picked up this test on that visit. What would be very interesting would be to find out whether the test is still used there, and if so, what the results are like. From the mid-1990s onwards, S.A. moved towards whole-language teaching, and I would expect this to have affected test scores. I'll see if I can find out anything more.

Jenny C.

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maizie
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Post by maizie » Sat Feb 23, 2008 6:36 pm

I wasn't particularly criticizing the test itself (apart from those two unfortunate M/S words!) but it is a fluency test, whereas I suspected that what Judy was after was a skills based test.

chew8
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Post by chew8 » Sat Feb 23, 2008 9:10 pm

It seems to me, though, that this test is a good indication of what can be achieved when children are given a good phonics start. The norms start at age 6-6, which would be half-way through the first year of school for S. African children. In 1987, average children at this stage could read about one word every 2 seconds - not hugely fast, and possibly allowing for some overt sounding out, but nevertheless showing that they had good basic word-attack skills and could probably manage some 'tricky' words and some digraphs. I don't think we should under-estimate the significance of this level of fluency just as an indication of children's facility with decoding after 6 months or so of good teaching.

Jenny C.

jenny
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Post by jenny » Sun Feb 24, 2008 3:28 pm

I often use this test as an indicator of reading fluency. The difference between childrens' reading speed is quite startling sometimes and, like it or not, fluency is regarded as a key indicator of dyslexia- I have taught a number of children whose reading was accurate and on an untimed test age-appropriate but who nevertheless emerged from DI testing with a diagnosis of dyslexia because of their slow processing speed.
Jenny W

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Post by chew8 » Sun Feb 24, 2008 3:49 pm

What you say, Jenny, suggests a meaning of 'dyslexia' which is similar to that used in German-speaking countries. There, 'dyslexics' read with a high level of accuracy but slowly. I wonder whether this was also the case among English-speaking children in S. Africa in the 1980s - it may well have been.

Jenny C.

Judy
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Post by Judy » Sun Feb 24, 2008 5:33 pm

Thank you all for your comments.

What I was looking for was a test that would show the gains made by pupils in the very early stages, in terms of Reading Ages, which Burt and Schonell don't. Currently I have two pupils who managed to score about 6yrs when I first tested them 6 months ago because they recognised a few sight words. Since then we have worked very hard and covered most of the basic code and overcome huge problems with blending so they are now able to read decodable text. However, they have shown so little gain on the Burt test that it is somewhat discouraging in view of all their persistence and hard work. I have seen this pattern before and I am confident that they will soon reach a 'tipping point' where they begin to read a lot more widely and make big gains in their Reading Ages without much more explicit instruction. But it seems a pity that we have no visible 'gain' in Reading Age to show for all their progress so far.

The difference between childrens' reading speed is quite startling sometimes and, like it or not, fluency is regarded as a key indicator of dyslexia
Of the ten children I currently work with, the two who most obviously have visual difficulties in spite of having normal eyesight, are by far my slowest readers.

I think reading speed is important because, although both of these pupils can understand what they are reading, they do not enjoy reading and it's not something they would normally do voluntarily. For the past few months, we have been working hard on increasing speed, both of single words and of reading a passage and in one case the parents have continued to work on timed reading at home and that pupil's reading speed has improved dramatically, as has her Burt Reading Age. I don't think it is a coincidence that she borrowed one of my Geronimo Stilton's to take on holiday at half term, nearly finished it and wants to read more of them. 'Normal' for her would be to be ploughing through the same book for months, with decreasing interest!

jenny
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Post by jenny » Mon Feb 25, 2008 7:31 pm

Jenny,
I think that you will find that most tests for dyslexia used in this country also involve reading speed. Certainly the Dyslexia Screening Test is timed for most items. The tests used by Dyslexia Action (formerly the Dyslexia Institute) are timed. This does lead to some difficult situations as parents are often very alarmed by the results of such testing when they are being reassured at school that a child is making good progress. There are some children who read accurately but slowly and will therefore always be regarded as dyslexic for the purposes of exam concessions etc.
Jenny

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