OT-- "joined-up" writing

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palisadesk
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OT-- "joined-up" writing

Post by palisadesk » Mon Nov 12, 2007 2:12 am

I'm looking for suggestions about clear-cut and easy to use materials to teach "joined-up" writing as you call it in the UK. Over here we still use loopy, curlicue script (especially for letters like f, k, etc., and capitals) which is extremely difficult for some children to master. There is no longer much emphasis on handwriting so many children just keep on printing. However I have several who urgently need to develop "joined-up" writing to increase their speed somewhat (trying to use "loopy" cursive writing for speed quickly degenerates into a scribble).

I like the Handwriting Without Tears approach (www.hwtears.com)
but their letters are too "loopy." (see here: http://www.hwtears.com/backtoschool/cur ... ercase.pdf)

An italic style would work better for the kids I am thinking of. They print adequately but definitely prefer angular, not loopy, letters.

What have people found useful for middle-grade children (ages 9-12)?

Susan S.

mtyler
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Post by mtyler » Mon Nov 12, 2007 8:08 am

I like the book Write Now by Barbara Getty and Inga Dubay. It teaches Italic, Cursive Italic, and Calligraphy.

I would also suggest the program Startwrite. It allows you to make pages in many different fonts and is relatively easy to use. It is very limited, though in its scope, but I have found, worth the money.

You can order both through the catalog rainbowresource.com. The book costs 14 US dollars and the program 34 US dollars. You can view excerpts of the book on Amazon.com

Melissa
Minnesota, USA

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Susan Godsland
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Post by Susan Godsland » Mon Nov 12, 2007 9:34 am

Kath Balcombe's Handwriting for Windows?

http://www.kber.co.uk/hfw30.htm Handwriting for Windows CD-ROM.

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palisadesk
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Post by palisadesk » Mon Nov 12, 2007 12:48 pm

Those CD's look great..... but due to building construction I don't have access to a computer at school, and in any event would not be able to load a program onto one (system is set up to prevent individuals from doing this).

The Getty book looks more aimed at adults. What do people in the UK (or Australia) use to *teach* cursive writing? Are there workbooks? Teacher guides? Worksheets? Any aimed at kids 9-12? (If I have to use something for younger children I will). I have quite a few "calligraphy" books but while children have enjoyed doing "calligraphy" it has not improved their regular writing speed. The books all require fancy pens or nibs. I'm looking for more everyday italic writing.

Blackline masters would be ideal. If I print something I have to pay for it all myself, at ten cents a page;(

Susan S.

Judy
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Post by Judy » Mon Nov 12, 2007 1:20 pm

Susan - unfortunately the very good non-loopy cursive handwriting book I use no longer seems to be available. But just in case you were able to get a copy, perhaps on ebay, it is called 'Learning to Write - starting joined-up writing'
by Peter Smith,
published exclusively for WH Smith
ISBN 0-17-424562-9.

Otherwise you might be able find something suitable here -

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_ss_b?u ... x=7&Go.y=7

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Post by Judy » Mon Nov 12, 2007 3:11 pm

I googled for Peter Smith and Learn Handwriting and got this -

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Nelson-Handwrit ... 017424066X

- but unfortunately no illustration, so possibly no help to you?

But the word 'handwriting' on the illustration on this page looks exactly like the style in the book I have -

http://www.nelsonthornes.com/nelson_pri ... /index.htm

I googled a little further and found this -

http://aa.nelsonthornes.com/downloads/p ... 769935.pdf

It seems to be part of a series for different ages/levels.

eagertolearn
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Post by eagertolearn » Mon Nov 12, 2007 10:31 pm

We use a style called Kingston cursive. (Check link below)
You can also download a font for free called Boring Boring.

http://www.trts.co.uk/cursive_handwriting.htm


There are quite a few things on this site - not too sure if all are useful.

Maybe someone could have a look at this too.

http://www.trts.co.uk/contents_srb.htm

Useful?

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Post by Anna » Tue Nov 13, 2007 1:50 pm

Hi all,

This topic is very relevant for me at the moment as I want to write some spelling and handwriting worksheets to go alongide the BRI/ARI books for my pupils. Some are the earlier stages and so using pre-cursive at school (I believe most schools use flicks but not many use entry strokes, although I know Debbie is keen on them from Yr 1). Some start all the letters from the wrong place or form the letter incorrectly. Others may be moving onto cursive in school but different styles are used, so it's a bit of a nightmare. :cry:

I am trying to dcide between buying Kath's Balcombe Pre-cursive (and cursive?) CD Roms which includes entry strokes as an option or the Sassoon font (Geraldine is printing her UK version in Sassoon). However, the Nelson font CD looks useful and I like the fact that you can add tramlines - v useful. Any suggestions/thoughts would be welcomed. I'm feeling a bit overwelmed. I almost wish we had a set UK style as in the Australian states - as I learned from Chris Jolly's v imformativbe talk on Friday. :cool:

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Post by Anna » Tue Nov 13, 2007 3:37 pm

Just looked at the price of the Nelson font - £123- think that rules that one out! LOL

eagertolearn
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Post by eagertolearn » Tue Nov 13, 2007 11:24 pm

Anna, this font is free and is the closest font I have found to the cursive type you might be ooking for:

http://desktoppub.about.com/library/fon ... boring.htm

When you eventually want them to join the letters, you can change the format on the font to bring them closer together so that they join.


Some teachers at our school use the ground, grass and sky handwriting strip idea:

http://www.sparklebox.co.uk/thumbs746-7 ... 9prev.html

Some interesting points in this article too:

http://www.handwritingcompetition.co.uk ... rticle.pdf


I was also wondering - has anyone entered the National Handwriting Competition before? Our school has entered every year for three years now and we haven't had a single entry even place yet!! The kids love it and are convinced we will have at least one winner this year!

http://www.handwritingcompetition.co.uk ... Exp=Y#1044

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Post by Debbie Hepplewhite » Tue Nov 13, 2007 11:32 pm

http://www.rrf.org.uk/newsletter.php?n_ID=45

Do you really need a 'programme' per se?

Don't you just need a handwriting style?

I have been thinking about writing some simple guidance for this handwriting style.

I have had huge success with it although I appreciate that this is in part because of the way that I teach it!

I haven't time now, but in a few days I'll write something further on this thread.

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palisadesk
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Post by palisadesk » Thu Nov 15, 2007 2:02 am

Debbie Hepplewhite wrote: Do you really need a 'programme' per se?

Don't you just need a handwriting style?
Actually, I think I do need a program. I haven't a clue how to teach cursive writing. Just providing some models and telling children to join the letters is not likely to work, and I can't model it myself. I would probably meet criteria for dysgraphia if you factor speed into the equation. My claim to fame is that I write perfect schoolteacher cusive -- on the chalkboard, in mirror writing or upside down from right to left. Amazes the audience, but not very practical. To get around the left-hander's dilemma, I wrote for many years by turning the paper upside down and writing from right to left. I developed my own joined printing style but it is not at all conventional (legible though).


So, to teach children with obvious difficulty how to join up their letters and write with more flow, I need something step-by-step. That Boring Boring font looked quite nifty, but I can't load it into the computers and use it:-( Ditto the font CD's. A "program" with blackline masters would be ideal. If I knew more about how to teach handwriting sequentially and thoroughly, I wouldn't need the detailed materials, but because I don't know, I need something that starts at the beginning (many of these kids form their letters incorrectly, and none have ever been taught to use entry strokes). By this time the children's habits are entrenched (they are in Grades 5 and 6), but they would like to be able to write in cursive -- it has a "grown-up" connotation and would be something they could take pride in. Most are eager to learn but give up easily, so I am looking for something I can readily break into steps and have them practice to mastery.

Susan S.

mtyler
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Post by mtyler » Thu Nov 15, 2007 2:17 am

Dear Susan,

The Italic Handwriting Series, for grades 1-6, is available on Amazon.com. This takes a much slower approach than the book I first recommended. Joined writing begins in book 2 or 3. They also sell books of blackline masters for each level.

Each book is 8.75 US dollars. The blackline masters books are each 10.75 US dollars.

Melissa
Minnesota, USA

JAC
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Post by JAC » Thu Nov 15, 2007 11:45 pm

http://www.cambridge.org/uk/education/p ... quence.htm

This is another programme using Sassoon called Penpals for Writing. I've posted the link to the scope and sequence page. I used it when I was figuring out the best order to teach handwriting joins at my school, which has no useful materials.

When I get older children who start letters at the wrong point then it is important to have a change of mind set and start teaching join-up - they'll never change their printing habits easily.

I had quite a lot of success with a Y2 'join-up' writing group at school last year. We had about 5-10 minutes 4 days a week, simply doing one - minute timings of, for example, perhaps two letters joined eg 'am', for a simple diagonal join. I had that particular group of children right through most of Y1 for handwriting as well so they were quite good. Consistent, short bursts of practice.

You don't have to have expensive consumable work books which are not always exactly what you want.

You can make up your own lined paper, but there is also blank lined paper guides on the RALP site in the handwriting materials. I made up my own writing paper and booklets,, custom-made!

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Post by eagertolearn » Fri Nov 16, 2007 2:24 am

If you find Boring Boring font difficult to download let me know and I can send you the file and instructions for loading onto your PC.

As I mentioned before - I think the KINGSTON handwriting style book has all you'd need. (It is also very cheap.) The quality of the books is very dated - but the theory and resources are fit for the purpose.

There is also a great animation for this Kingston Cursive style on the webite:

www.communication4all.co.uk

It has an animated pen that draws each letter out in the correct formation.

The Kingston scheme is on this website as I mentioned before, I really would take a look.

http://www.trts.co.uk/cursive_handwriting.htm

There are three books:

HANDWRITING FOR BEGINNERS (HWB)
Photocopiable work sheets, which start with movement patterns and progress to specific letters.

HANDWRITING COPY BOOK (HWC)
Individual letter practice sheets followed by carefully ordered copy sheets for joining practice. Each sheet introduces a new letter and the letters already learned are listed at the top of each sheet. Later sheets introduce complete sentences and capital letters. A4. Wire bound. 70 pages.

FOUNDATIONS (KB)
An introduction to the teaching strategies and resources of the Kingston style - which also serves as a practical teachers’ guide for implementing the handwriting scheme. The shape and formation of each individual letter is explained and commented on in detail.

I think that the three books are about £40 all together - but all the resources are free like the font and the animation etc.

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