Anne Glennie TESS article 'Bring on the reading wars'

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Susan Godsland
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Anne Glennie TESS article 'Bring on the reading wars'

Post by Susan Godsland » Fri Apr 17, 2015 12:40 pm

Anne Glennie, who spoke at the RRF conference, has an article in the TESS today.

Bring on the reading wars

https://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=11006970
This is quite at odds with how we operate in Scotland, and quite different from how we approach the teaching of early reading. We have the professional freedom to choose our own methods of instruction – to adapt them to suit our local contexts and learners. We prefer to have what we consider to be a more sensible approach, providing a balanced menu of reading activities with some phonics on the side.

But should we be relieved that no one is mandating methodologies or forcing phonics checks on us in Scotland? Or should we be worried about it?

Our nearest neighbour is beginning to make inroads into the attainment gap by emphasising phonics “first, fast and only”. This approach has certainly put the C-A-T among the pigeons. However, it has also led to practitioners reviewing current research, reflecting on classroom practice and, crucially, engaging in debates (yes, even sometimes arguments) about what is truly most effective when it comes to teaching children to read.

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Re: Anne Glennie TESS article 'Bring on the reading wars'

Post by Susan Godsland » Thu Apr 30, 2015 10:16 am

Literacy standards decline in Scottish schools

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/11 ... hools.html

Here's the full report on the literacy of Scottish kids.

http://www.gov.scot/Resource/0047/00475921.pdf

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Re: Anne Glennie TESS article 'Bring on the reading wars'

Post by Susan Godsland » Wed May 13, 2015 11:42 am

Don't miss listening to this download of Anne Glennie talking about essentials of teaching reading and what's missing from Scottish ITT

http://www.edutalk.info/wp-content/uplo ... 5-2015.mp3

I've also heard that Tom Bennett has booked Anne to speak at researchED Scotland conference on August the 29th. They have a treat in store :cool:

Anne also provides this free download 'Closing the reading gap - a practical plan for schools.
http://www.edutalk.info/wp-content/uplo ... l-Plan.pdf

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Re: Anne Glennie TESS article 'Bring on the reading wars'

Post by moomintroll » Sat May 16, 2015 3:33 pm

Just had to add this to the thread - advice from Sue Ellis on reading in this week's TES Scotland.
No more ‘input-outputs’

According to Ellis, schools need access to better data on literacy focusing on what matters most – pupils’ comprehension, decoding fluency and engagement – at a point in the year that is useful. Schools also need to become better at analysing that data. This means moving away from what she describes as “the input-output approach”, or “if they are bad at x, you give them more of x”.

“If a child is poor at decoding – reading slowly and stiltingly – the solution might not be for them to read more with the teacher,” Ellis explains. “It might be that you need to make reading more exciting, make them see it as something they do out of school, or provide them with more books – not reading-scheme books.”

The aspiration of Curriculum for Excellence that every teacher – regardless of subject specialism – should be a teacher of literacy has not been realised, Ellis argues. Teachers have to be able to create a learning mix that works, but studying literacy development and teaching is not always a major plank in initial teacher education, she says.

Ellis wants the General Teaching Council for Scotland to review whether sufficient weight is given to literacy teaching in teacher education programmes. Some institutions allocate just 20 hours in a four-year degree – four times less than others.
The full article is available here: https://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=11007274

I feel a blog coming on...

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Re: Anne Glennie TESS article 'Bring on the reading wars'

Post by maizie » Sat May 16, 2015 5:51 pm

Reading for pleasure is what makes the difference, researchers believe.
:roll:


This thread might be relevant...

http://www.rrf.org.uk/messageforum/view ... f=1&t=6032

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Re: Anne Glennie TESS article 'Bring on the reading wars'

Post by moomintroll » Sat May 16, 2015 8:02 pm

Thank you Maizie - great link. The Read On, Get On report for Scotland is worse, I think - actively promotes sight words... it shows why this belief is so widespread. The 'Ten Minutes a Day' mantra is very misleading I feel :-(

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Re: Anne Glennie TESS article 'Bring on the reading wars'

Post by maizie » Sat May 16, 2015 8:21 pm

And Anne Glennie has posted an excellent blog on the same topic:

http://www.thelearningzoo.co.uk/2015/05 ... ll-i-know/

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Re: Anne Glennie TESS article 'Bring on the reading wars'

Post by JIM CURRAN » Sun May 17, 2015 6:45 am

Thanks Maisie,excellent article a must read for any young or confused teacher.

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Re: Anne Glennie TESS article 'Bring on the reading wars'

Post by volunteer » Tue May 19, 2015 5:54 pm

Yes, it's a good article. The other thing that strikes me about the answer to what to do next when a child is reading "slowly and stiltedly" is to think about whether this is actually a problem at the stage that they are at and to realise that, depending on the nature of "slow and stilted", it might actually be a very good thing.

I experience teachers at my children's "mixed methods" school who praise what they consider to be "fluency" above all else. So a child who is going through a careful stage of sounding out and blending new words - maybe many times until those words are quickly recognisable - is made to feel that this kind of reading is not as good as the child who can read swiftly out loud in a pleasant sing-song voice and make up a few words that fit in as they go along. For me, the invention of a few words as they go along would ring more alarm bells than slow and stilted.

One of my children who entered reception able to "read" according to me - i.e. could lift the words off the page (albeit simple ones that matched the code she already knew and involved some sounding out and blending for unfamiliar ones) and understand them was considered not to be able to read in any shape or form at the start of reception and by the end of reception still not to be reading according to the foundation stage profile points they awarded her, despite in reality having made a huge amount of progress (at home at least).

Do teachers and parents need some real videos of real children going through these stages? I sometimes think that what is actually a very simple process of teaching the GPCs, teaching to sound out and blend, building up reading stamina and faster word recognition of words which have been sounded out and blended enough times, sounds very complex to most people. So opting for "whole word" recognition and guessing from pictures etc seems like an easier alternative .... but it's not except with children who somehow just naturally and effortlessly pick up a phonic way of doing things and can apply what they have learned to new words they encounter.

It's much easier on Youtube these days to find free instruction on most things under the sun than how to teach a child to read using synthetic phonics.

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Re: Anne Glennie TESS article 'Bring on the reading wars'

Post by Debbie Hepplewhite » Tue May 19, 2015 7:38 pm

Volunteer, I agree with what you said here:

I experience teachers at my children's "mixed methods" school who praise what they consider to be "fluency" above all else. So a child who is going through a careful stage of sounding out and blending new words - maybe many times until those words are quickly recognisable - is made to feel that this kind of reading is not as good as the child who can read swiftly out loud in a pleasant sing-song voice and make up a few words that fit in as they go along. For me, the invention of a few words as they go along would ring more alarm bells than slow and stilted.
In training, I encourage teachers not to over-value 'reading aloud with expression' at the expense of accuracy.

I go on to say that in every classroom there are children who will never read 'with fluency and expression' - they may well be monotone forever.

I ask who has such a child in their class - everyone raises their hands.

I then point out how misguided it could be to over-emphasise the fluency and expression - especially for the monotone children and the slower readers - as this draws unwarranted attention to them and will cause them embarrassment and stress when asked to read aloud to others.

This is not a small point, it's a very big issue - and one I doubt is normally addressed in teacher-training.

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