Is Poverty Destiny?

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JIM CURRAN
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Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by JIM CURRAN » Sat Sep 22, 2012 5:16 pm

Is Poverty Destiny?: Ideology v. Evidence in Education Reform

No Excuses” Reformers insist that the source of success and failure lies in each child and each teacher, requiring only the adequate level of effort to rise out of the circumstances not of her/his making. As well, “No Excuses” Reformers remain committed to addressing poverty solely or primarily through education, viewed as an opportunity offered each child and within which…effort will result in success.Social Context Reformers have concluded that the source of success and failure lies primarily in the social and political forces that govern our lives. By acknowledging social privilege and inequity, Social Context Reformers are calling for education reform within a larger plan to reform social inequity—such as access to health care, food security, higher employment along with better wages and job security.

http://educationviews.org/is-poverty-de ... on-reform/

JIM CURRAN
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by JIM CURRAN » Sun Sep 23, 2012 11:53 am

Thousands of pupils shamed out of free school meals
300,000 prefer to take a packed lunch rather than face 'stigma' of sitting apart from friends, research shows

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/201 ... als-stigma

MonaMMcNee
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by MonaMMcNee » Tue Sep 25, 2012 7:19 am

Frank Field is now leading a study on how to prevent poor children becoming poor adults. I email him and he says he will only have time for me AFER his report is out.
Emails etc. from me to my LEA, my MP, Ofsted and DfE all say they will not accept anyhing more from me on the subject of literacy. I see that Ruth Miskin has talked to UCET. So once again there is a united front in favour of phonics schemes based on sounds, and the headline continues: "FAILED FAILED FAILED (Daily Mail). Tom Burkard comments that the 6+ spelling test is a step in the right direction! (and that my writings are "ramblings" ) - we need the old tests, for a range of ages 4-11 !
If all the clout, the experts are united, and the result is failure, then the experts are WRONG!
We, the RRF, needs to end its support for "Letters and Sounds" based on 44 sounds. We need phonics , a writing path, based on 26 LETTERS. The first 6 letters taught must be c-a-t d-o-g. Not satnip.

We need (1) to drop all other "range of strategies", flash cards etc.
2. We need systematic phonics, not the jumbled mess of "Letters and Sounds" which is NOT systematic.
3. Surely somebody can reach the Chancellor and say £91bn a year is excessive - but Gove keeps on throwing money at it - £600 for each failed child needing special ed??? Our country is bankrupt.

The RRF used to issue a Newsletter. Now it seems you have to log on to find out what is happening.
Is there no fee now that will permit a newsletter?
Is the RRF supporting Richard Freeman, an Ulster teacher who achieved results that "stunned" inspectors and (like Martin Turner in 1990) he got the sack this July - but he is fightihg.
If the RRF keeps on supporting Letters and Sounds and other programmes based on 44 sounds, and has stopped challenging the Blob, you are a part of The Blob, supporting failure.

Why have a password? Surely we want the widest possible intake, contact?
I know what is wrong, but nobody contacts me. I now have "Why Billy can'g read" and a DVD. Anybody who really wants literacy, please contact me: Mona McNee, 2 Keats Avenue, Whiston L35 2 xR, email catphonics@blueyonder.co.uk (no password required!)

JAC
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by JAC » Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:23 am

We have a programme here called Four Corners - a documentary about social issues. Last night's was about poverty, from the point of view of the children, all living on a sink estate, which incidentally, from an aerial view looked quite attractive. One of the striking things about the children, was the fear that they experienced on a regular basis, not just from domestic violence, but from teenage boys on the estate.
One of the families shown was a father, who admitted to being illiterate. His young son had brought his reading book home from school, an emergent reader, with an envelope of sight words to be - the seeds of creating the next generation of illiteracy.
http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/

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Susan Godsland
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by Susan Godsland » Tue Sep 25, 2012 10:35 am

http://anniemurphypaul.com/2012/09/movi ... maybe-not/
The Brookings Institution has released an important new report about what it takes to get to, and stay in, the middle class in America:

“Children born into middle-income families have a roughly equal chance of moving up or down once they become adults, but those born into rich or poor families have a high probability of remaining rich or poor as adults. The chance that a child born into a family in the top income quintile will end up in one of the top three quintiles by the time they are in their forties is 82 percent, while the chance for a child born into a family in the bottom quintile is only 30 percent. In short, a rich child in the U.S. is more than twice as likely as a poor child to end up in the middle class or above.”

MonaMMcNee
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by MonaMMcNee » Tue Sep 25, 2012 10:50 am

Children, rich and poor, fail in schools because teachers are MIStrained. The first six letters HAVE TO BE c-a-t d o g.
Now I find that government has boosted the harmful power of The Blob by setting up at the London Institute of education (!) the Univesity Council for the Education of 'Teachers. (unless this is merely a new name for the Institute's work in education).
The Institute gave a base for Dame Marie Clay until she died.
I have sent the "Why Billy can't read" booklet to NUT at 60 universities and not a single one has (had th courage to) contacted me, but they are today's victims.
With failure at such a level, there has to be SOMEONE with a bit of clout who will promote DEcoding honics! It takes less than an hour to UNDERSTAND. RRF people might refer to newsletter 2003 when Jennie Chew visited a school in Arizona that taught the rules, similar to my Step by Step and she found that "it worked" but she says we are unfamiliar with such a programme here. She herself taught it to Tom in 1997!
Does anybody know perhaps schoool governors who could persuade their school to use it ?
www.phonics4free.org) in their school AND drop all else?
Cananyone in the NW visit me, to UNDERSTAND why Letters and Sounds, Distar etc. are not the best?
The staff of the DfE, Gove, Wilshaw, censor the mail they receive and block my access.m That surely is a scandal!I cannot reach Gove, Wilshaw. Can you?
Mona McNee

chew8
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by chew8 » Tue Sep 25, 2012 5:29 pm

As Mona says, I visited a Spalding school in Arizona in 2003 and was very impressed as I said in my article in RRF Newsletter 51. I also said, however, that the children were a year or so older than Reception children in England would be, and that the approach might not be so suitable for younger children. My own children and grandchildren have all learnt to read long before Reception age, but I don’t think they’d have coped with the Spalding approach to writing in Reception. Because we started teaching them phonics when they were so young, I would say that the route they followed was the ‘reading road to writing’ rather than the ‘writing road to reading’, as with Spalding.

I’m puzzled by the following:
Mona wrote:Jennie Chew visited a school in Arizona that taught the rules, similar to my Step by Step and she found that "it worked" but she says we are unfamiliar with such a programme here. She herself taught it to Tom in 1997!
I have never used the Spalding programme at all, and I have never used your Step by Step systematically, Mona – you have commented on this in the past. When I taught Tom, I used the sort of home-grown phonics approach I had used with my own children in the 1970s. I did use some of your games, but made no more use of them than I made of my own games.

Tom was 4 years 9 months old when I started working with him – he had very poor physical co-ordination (he hadn’t walked until he was nearly 2 and had been diagnosed as ‘dyspraxic’) and he found writing a huge effort, so I spent most of the time on reading. I felt that this was his greatest need, as his school’s approach relied heavily on ‘sight’ words and guessing from pictures. He went on to do well throughout school, despite some problems at home, and is now at university.

Re. Ruth Miskin: there was a time when you were very impressed with her approach, Mona - you told me this after you had visited her school, probably in the late 1990s. I continue to be in touch with her, and I regard her as never having deviated from promoting the kind of phonics that produced excellent results at that school, but she knows, as do many of us, that however hard one tries to get teachers to implement good programmes faithfully, they often take great liberties.

Jenny C.

MonaMMcNee
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by MonaMMcNee » Tue Sep 25, 2012 5:48 pm

Ruth Miskin is a superb teacher of children, but her "Read Write Inc" conforms to government teaching - based on 44 sounds.
We need a programme based on writing. Spalding I'S based on writing and I did study it in 1990, but I thought it was too cold , to academic for parents. Therefore I created my own, similar but with games, worksheets, puzzles, which IS suitable for parents.
It also works for the very young, 4+.

If teachers would try it, they would need no further persuading.
The puzzle is why so many teachers, born with common sense, ever accepted "ai ee igh oa oo" to teach long vowels.

chew8
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by chew8 » Tue Sep 25, 2012 6:39 pm

Haven't you sent your materials to an RRFer to try, Mona? Will we get feedback from that in due course?

Yes, Ruth Miskin is a superb teacher of children, but it's not just this: her programme produces excellent results when faithfully implemented by others. This must count for a lot.

I haven't time to say more now or, possibly, for the next 36 hours.

Jenny C.

MonaMMcNee
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by MonaMMcNee » Tue Sep 25, 2012 6:51 pm

y once more, we need figures from a tst after 1 term, 1 eear, 2,3 years, by ? teh N.F.E.R.
Otherwise we are left with "he said, she said".
Woithuo figures, I offer that Jolly Phonics or "Read WRite Inc" may well raise the 7+ aRQ 10-13 points IF used on its own. Once there is a "mix of methods", comparison dies.
I think the use of "Step by Step" ON ITS OWN would raise attainment a good 20 points, back to "universal literacy" and dyslexia would seem to shrink dramatically.
Also, the cost would shrink, since Step is free now. Only figures will tell.

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maizie
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by maizie » Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:04 pm

MonaMMcNee wrote:Woithuo figures, I offer that Jolly Phonics or "Read WRite Inc" may well raise the 7+ aRQ 10-13 points IF used on its own. Once there is a "mix of methods", comparison dies.
If these programmes are taught alongside 'mixed methods' the programmes themselves can not blamed for any poor results. Exactly the same thing is likely to happen whatever good programme is misused in such a way.

It is certainly not, to my knowledge, the intention of any of the SP programme developers that their programmes should be taught as part of mixed methods.

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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by MonaMMcNee » Wed Sep 26, 2012 8:40 am

I did think, when the word “phonics“ became respectable (March 2006), any kind of phonics would give us a considerable improvement, and teachers would be won over to like and enjoy it, but we end up with the TES headline “Phonics knocked off its perch”.
I believe that somehow HARM HAS BEEN DONE. Is there any way to quantify the time wasted, harm done, by flash cards, “learning” high frequency words as such instead of sounding/blending, shared reading, graded readers? I do not use graded readers to teach/learn. After a pupil has done soft c,g I find they can then read Shortie books, Trog.
It was not until I studied “Letters and Sounds” all jumbled up, that I realised the two versions of “phonics”, one based on 44 sounds, and the other based on writing 26 letters.
Teachers should teach first the 6 letters of dog cat to prevent the common confusion of b/d. Learn the anti-clockwise movement at the very start and you get “d” well fixed before you teach l; l k h b. I note that L&S does teach d g o c as 8 9 10 11 letters, but talks of “magnetic letters” and “letters stacked” so the pupil is not learning them by writing (pen, pencil).
“b” is No.18. Think of another pattern: r n m, all starting with the same motion.
I wish there were a way to isolate the bits of a mix, and show how much each bit was useful/harmful – because at today's failure level harm is done, to millions. And the job satisfaction due to teachers' hard work is just not there.
I find that a new quango, the University Council for the Education of teachers, and where is it? The London Institute of education, which has been regarded as the flagship for teachers - and MUST bear major responsibility for decades of failure! But still Gove etc. bow to the idea of professionals! What hope is there for a re-think in that world?
Think about the training that you will find from government and other similar programmes, a training weekend or longer. My “Step by Step” needs NO training, just a willingness to drop ideas that have become received wisdom since 1945.
Surely an annual budget of £91bn and still rising shows the need for cuts! Read Chris Woodhead's 2002 book, “Class war” - ten years ago and ignored!
Until schools get it right, parents should (and can) teach their own child, and school-proof him.
Mona M.

MonaMMcNee
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by MonaMMcNee » Wed Sep 26, 2012 10:04 am

If reformers think it all depends on the background, they will not helop us.
If any of you wish to reach me direct, my email is catphonics@blueyonder.co.uk
Mona McNee

chew8
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by chew8 » Wed Sep 26, 2012 1:31 pm

I’m still pushed for time – I’m on granny-duty until 6.30 p.m. and am then due at a meeting.
Mona wrote:I offer that Jolly Phonics or "Read WRite Inc" may well raise the 7+ aRQ 10-13 points IF used on its own.
I assume that you mean 10-13 points of average reading quotient (ARQ) Mona.It has occurred to me that we needn’t rely purely on speculation as far as Jolly Phonics is concerned – we can use Marlynne Grant’s 6-year run of results (see RRF Newsletter 52). There were 80+ children in all the Reception cohorts except the first.

Marlynne doesn’t give the average chronological age of the children, but it looks as if the testing was done in June each year, at which point Reception classes would typically have an average chronological age of 5 years 3 months. On that basis. the ARQ in the first year was 109.5 (Burt test) – but that was the year in which JP was started only after Easter so the children had had only one term of it. In subsequent years, the ARQs were 116, 127, 125, 125, and 123.5 – all higher than you would expect, Mona, and also higher in most cases than the ARQ you would expect if Step by Step were used on its own.

For comparisons to be really fair, the same test would have to be used for all children and checks would have to be made that all programmes had been properly implemented, but I don’t think that the available evidence justifies the assumption that Step would outperform other programmes.

Jenny C.

JIM CURRAN
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Re: Is Poverty Destiny?

Post by JIM CURRAN » Mon Oct 08, 2012 8:37 am

Edinburgh's educational inequality 'joint-worst' in ScotlandGuardian investigation finds only seven children from the city's poorest areas got grades for top university last year

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/oct/0 ... university

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